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In-Person Training from Our OSHA Authorized Instructors

Looking for onsite safety training for your employees? 

Training classes provided by our Certified Safety Professionals are customized to your needs and schedule and performed at your facility or job site.  OSHA’s standards and regulations impact your business on a daily basis and proper safety training is essential to success. Whether you’re a small construction firm or a large manufacturing company we will work with you to ensure your employees are properly trained on OSHA regulations and requirements. Our affordable, results-focused training programs keeps your employees safe and OSHA satisfied.

Our team of experienced Certified Safety Professionals are OSHA authorized instructors for the OSHA 10-Hour General Industry, OSHA 30-Hour General Industry, OSHA 10-Hour Construction, and OSHA-30 Hour Construction courses.  In addition, our instructors can teach a wide variety of courses covering OSHA regulations.

Expertise

Expertise

Our OSHA authorized Safety Professionals and Safety Experts have over 20 years of teaching experience. You can count on us to know OSHA safety guidelines and regulations. We work with you to design a training curriculum specific to your business and safety needs.

Effective

Effective

Our experienced trainers are known for their quality instruction. We keep students engaged using real life examples, interacting with the students throughout the course.  Our goal is to educate your employees on the importance of safety in the workplace and the value in following OSHA guidelines and regulations.

Convenient

Convenient

Our training is designed around your business and your schedule, at your location or virtual.  We can schedule training during the week or on weekends. We manage all of the paperwork and have your DOL OSHA cards mailed directly to your employees.

Most Popular OSHA Training Courses

More than 100 of OSHAs standards include requirements for training. In addition to the courses listed below, we work with you to meet all of your onsite safety training needs. Our team of OSHA Authorized Instructors are qualified to teach courses on all OSHA regulations.  

OSHA Construction courses (10-Hour and 30-Hour) (OSHA 29 CFR 1926) provide critical and important training for construction workers, construction supervisors, and any individual that needs to be aware of workplace safety on large and small construction sites. 

 

OSHA 10-Hour Construction Courses Include: (Designed for Construction Workers) 

Required: 

  • Intro to OSHA  
  • Falls  
  • Electrocution  
  • Struck By
  • Caught In or Between
  • Personal Protective & Lifesaving Equipment
  • Health Hazards in Construction  

Elective/Optional: 

  • Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators & Conveyors
  • Excavations
  • Materials Handling, Storage, Use and Disposal
  • Scaffolds
  • Stairways & Ladders
  • Tools- Hand & Power
  • Whistleblower Protection Program    

OSHA 30-Hour Construction Courses Include:  (Designed for Supervisors/Managers) 

Required 

  • Intro to OSHA   
  • Managing Safety & Health
  • Falls
  • Electrocution
  • Struck By
  • Caught In or Between
  • Personal Protective & Lifesaving Equipment
  • Health Hazards in Construction
  • Stairways & Ladders  

Elective/Optional: 

  • Concrete & Masonry Construction  
  • Confined Space Entry
  • Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators & Conveyors
  • Ergonomics
  • Excavations
  • Fire Protection & Prevention
  • Materials Handling, Storage, Use and Disposal
  • Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment and Marine Operations; Rollover Protective Structures & Overhead Protection; and Signs, Signals and Barricades
  • Powered Industrial Vehicles
  • Safety & Health Programs
  • Scaffolds
  • Steel Erections
  • Tools- Hand & Power
  • Welding & Cutting
  • Whistleblower Protection Program
  • Competent Person Excavation and Trench 
  • Competent Person Scaffold Training 
  • Competent Person Fall Protection Training 
  • Permit Confined Space Training 
  • NFPA 70e Training ARC FLASH TRAINING 
  • Scissor Lift Training 
  • Boom Lift Training  

OSHA General Industry courses are intended to provide instruction on a variety of general safety and health standards. OSHA General Courses (OSHA 29 CFR 1910) are intended for employees in or on job sites including but not limited to: school districts, manufacturing of all types, mills, oil & gas, food industry (restaurants, grocery store warehouses, package food), site distribution centers/warehousing, pipe yards, and/or any job site that is covered under the “general industry” OSHA standard.  

OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Courses Include: (Designed for Regular Workers/Employees) 

Required   

  • Intro to OSHA                                                                   
  • Walking & Working Surfaces, including Fall Protection  
  • Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, Fire Prevention Electrical                                                                    
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                             
  • Hazardous Communication
  • Hazardous Materials   

Electives/Optional   

  • Materials Handling  
  • Machine Guarding  
  • Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Ergonomics
  • Fall Protection
  • Safety & Health Programs
  • Whistleblower Protection Program  

 

OSHA 30-Hour General Industry Courses Include: (Designed for Supervisors/Managers) 

Required   

  • Intro to OSHA                                                                   
  • Managing Safety & Health
  • Walking & Working Surfaces, including Fall Protection
  • Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, Fire Prevention Plans, & Fire Protection Plan
  • Electrical
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Materials Handling
  • Hazardous Communication  

Electives/Optional   

  • Hazardous Materials (Flammable & Combustible Liquids, Spray Finishing, Compressed Gas, Dipping & Coating Operations)  
  • Permit-Required Confined Spaces  
  • Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)
  • Machine Guarding
  • Welding, Cutting & Brazing
  • Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Ergonomics
  • Fall Protection
  • Safety & Health Programs
  • Powered Industrial Vehicles
  • Whistleblower Protection Program
  • Competent person fall protection training
  • Forklift operator training
  • Equipment certification
  • Scissor Lift Training
  • Boom lift Training
  • Permit Confined space training
  • NFPA 70e training ARC FLASH TRAINING
  • Lock Out, Tag Out (LOTO) Authorized & Affected
  • Bloodborne Pathogens (BBP)
  • Office Ergonomics
  • Workplace Ergonomics
  • And more...  

HAZWOPER is an acronym that stands for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response. Per OSHA standard, 29 CFR Part 1910.120, HAZWOPER training is required for any workers who perform cleanup, emergency response, or corrective actions that involve the uncontrolled release of hazardous substances.  

8-Hour Refresher 

AdvanceOnline’s 8-Hour HAZWOPER Annual Refresher course meets the requirements outlined in OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120. This course is for general site workers who complete tasks involving removing hazardous waste, exposure or potentially exposed to hazardous substances, exposure to health hazards and who need to refresh an existing 24-Hour or 40-Hour HAZWOPER certification.  

This AOS 8-Hour Refresher Course will cover: 

  • Decontamination 
  • Toxicology
  • Levels of Protection
  • Detecting Hazardous Materials
  • Respirators
  • Site Safety Planning
  • Hazard Communication
  • Hazardous Waste
  • Real world scenarios  

*Per OSHA’s requirements for HAZWOPER training, workers and supervisors at uncontrolled hazardous waste operations must be trained on these topics annually to remain competent. 
 

Employees that work at HAZWOPER job sites and are in the following positions, need an annual 8-Hour Refresher Course: 

  • Equipment operators 
  • General laborers 
  • Hazardous materials technicians 
  • Hazardous materials specialists 
  • Hazardous materials supervisors
  • On-scene incident commanders
  • Other general site workers
  • On-site management and supervisory personnel 

When does my HAZWOPER training or refresher course expire?  

HAZWOPER 8-Hour Training must be completed within 12 months of the anniversary date of your previous HAZWOPER training. If the OSHA required 8-Hour HAZWOPER training is not completed within that timeframe, you may be required to repeat the full 24-Hour or 40-Hour HAZWOPER training. 

The objectives of the OSHA 24-Hour HAZWOPER course are to meet the Federal OSHA HAZWOPER training requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(3)(ii) for general industry and 29 CFR 1926.65(e)(3)(iii) for construction. This course is also intended to meet any HAZWOPER training requirements for the EPA and State OSHA regulations. 

This AOS 24-Hour Course will cover: 

  • Introduction to OSHA 
  • Introduction to HAZWOPER 
  • HAZWOPER Training 
  • Regulatory Compliance 
  • Safety and Health Program
  • Medical Surveillance
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • The Importance of Dosage
  • Types of Toxic Substances
  • Toxicological Effects
  • Factors that Influence Toxicity
  • Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
  • Introduction to Biological Hazards
  • Hazard Communication
  • Physical and Chemical Properties
  • Introduction to Radiation
  • Physical Hazards
  • Walking and Working Surfaces
  • Fall Prevention and Protection
  • Electrical Hazards
  • Introduction to Confined Spaces
  • Cold Illnesses and Injuries
  • Heat Illnesses and Injuries
  • Heat Illness Prevention
  • Using the Heat Index
  • Other Physical Hazards
  • Introduction to Personal Protective Equipment
  • Introduction to Respiratory Protection
  • Introduction to Chemical Protective Clothing
  • Introduction to Monitoring and Detection
  • PPE for the Head, Eyes, Face, and Ears
  • PPE for the Hands and Feet
  • Waste Site Operations
  • Site Characterization and Analysis
  • Site Control Tactics and Strategy
  • Job Hazard Analysis
  • Handling Drums and Containers
  • Sampling Methods and Procedures
  • Managing Chemical Spills
  • Introduction to Decontamination
  • Emergency Response 
  • Understanding Temporary HAZWOPER Worksites
  • 24 Hour HAZWOPER Summary and Conclusions 

The AdvanceOnline OSHA 40-Hour HAZWOPER course provides in-depth training on how to perform post-emergency response activities and cleanups/remediation at industrial sites, Superfund and RCRA corrective action sites, and voluntary cleanups involving hazardous substances. Training includes hazard recognition, exposure limits and risk evaluation for chemical and general site safety concerns. You will review the technology and methods available to monitor and detect hazardous materials, learn how to control and contain chemical spills, establish a decontamination process, and select and use worker protective equipment, among a wide variety of other subjects. 

 

This AOS 40-Hour Course will cover: 

  • Introduction to OSHA 
  • Introduction to HAZWOPER 
  • HAZWOPER Training 
  • Regulatory Compliance 
  • Safety and Health Program 
  • Medical Surveillance 
  • Introduction to Toxicology 
  • The Importance of Dosage 
  • Types of Toxic Substances 
  • Toxicological Effects 
  • Factors that Influence Toxicity 
  • Introduction to Industrial Hygiene 
  • Introduction to Biological Hazards 
  • Hazard Communication 
  • Physical and Chemical Properties 
  • Introduction to Radiation 
  • Physical Hazards 
  • Walking and Working Surfaces 
  • Fall Prevention and Protection 
  • Electrical Hazards 
  • Introduction to Confined Spaces 
  • Cold Illnesses and Injuries 
  • Heat Illnesses and Injuries 
  • Heat Illness Prevention 
  • Using the Heat Index 
  • Other Physical Hazards 
  • Introduction to Personal Protective Equipment 
  • Introduction to Respiratory Protection 
  • Introduction to Chemical Protective Clothing 
  • Introduction to Monitoring and Detection 
  • PPE for the Head, Eyes, Face, and Ears 
  • PPE for the Hands and Feet 
  • Waste Site Operations 
  • Site Characterization and Analysis 
  • Site Control Tactics and Strategy 
  • Job Hazard Analysis 
  • Handling Drums and Containers 
  • Sampling Methods and Procedures 
  • Managing Chemical Spills 
  • Introduction to Decontamination 
  • Emergency Response 
  • Understanding Temporary HAZWOPER Worksites 
  • Using Respiratory Protection 
  • Types of Respiratory Protection 
  • Respirator Selection and Use 
  • Respirator Medical Evaluation 
  • Respirator Fit Testing 
  • Respirator Training Requirements 
  • Respirator Maintenance and Care 
  • Using Chemical Protective Clothing (CPC) 
  • Medical Considerations for Wearing CPC 
  • Using Chemical Protective Clothing 
  • Chemical Protective Clothing Selection 
  • Chemical Protective Clothing Classifications 
  • Donning and Doffing CPC 
  • Inspection, Storage, and Maintenance of CPC 
  • Decontaminating and Cleaning CPC 
  • Using Monitoring and Detection Devices 
  • Preventing Sparks During Gas Detection 
  • Sensor Technology 
  • Types of Gas Detection Systems 
  • Using Colorimetric Tubes 
  • Using Combustible Gas Indicators 
  • FIDs and PIDs 
  • Other Detection Devices 
  • Video Equipment Familiarization 
  • Respiratory Video Section 
  • Level-A Video Section 
  • Level-B Video Section 
  • CPC Components and Accessories Video Section 
  • Monitoring and Detection Video Section 
  • Miscellaneous Tools and Equipment Video Section 
  • Decontamination 
  • 40 Hour HAZWOPER Summary and Conclusion 

In both construction and general industry, a “Confined Space" is defined as a space that is “large enough for an employee to enter fully and perform assigned work, not designed for continuous occupancy by the employee, limited or restricted in the means of entry and exit.” An example of a confined space would include but aren’t limited to: tanks, storage bins, underground vaults, pits, diked areas, vessels, and silos. 

These spaces have configurations that hinder the activities of employees who must enter, work in, and exit them. This required training for construction is OSHA 29 CFR 1926, Subpart AA  and for other industries, confined space entry is regulated under 29 CFR 1910.146. 

Confined Space Training provides you with the knowledge and understanding of OSHA guidelines and how to protect yourself, your coworkers, or anyone you supervise while working in a confined space environment. This OSHA training is provided to prevent injury, illness, or death from common confined space hazards. 

 

Why are confined spaces considered dangerous? 

Confined spaces tend to be dangerous because they're difficult to exit quickly in an emergency and your mobility is limited while you're inside. Their nature also hinders effective communication or rescue. Finally, the close quarters and restricted airflow make it easier for heat, gas, and other hazards to build up or fill the space. 

 

What are the hazards of working in a confined space? 

Asphyxiation is the leading cause of death in confined spaces. Many conditions common to confined spaces can lead to asphyxiation: oxygen deficiency, toxic atmosphere buildup, drowning or engulfment in fine particulate matter, and torso compression. 

It's also possible to get trapped in confined spaces either by getting stuck in place or if your exit becomes blocked. Additionally, confined spaces amplify the hazards of whatever type of work you're performing. Noise, heat or cold, sparks, fumes, and visibility hindrances can all become a threat in a confined space very quickly.  

What is an OSHA “Permit-Required Confined Space” (PRCS)? 

A confined space permit is required by OSHA if the confined space has one or more of the following characteristics: 

  • Has the potential OR contains a hazardous atmosphere (examples include: Hydrogen Sulfide, Carbon Monoxide or Dioxide, Flammable Atmosphere)
  • The space contains a material the has the ability to engulf someone who enters the space (examples include: grains, sand, dirt, water)
  • The internal configuration, layout, or arrangement could cause an employee or anyone that enters to be trapped or asphyxiated (examples include: vaults, large-ovens, underground pits)
  • There are any other recognized serious safety or health hazards (examples include: wildlife, electrical or trip hazards, struck-by or fall hazards) 

OSHA Competent Person Training for Excavation, Trenching, and Shoring course is designed for individuals seeking certification for trenching and excavation operations in compliance with OSHA regulations specified in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P. 

This OSHA course will address requirements of the OSHA standards and provide information and training that is essential to workers associated with trenching and excavating so they are able to recognize hazardous conditions, take protective measures, and utilize best practices. 

Competent Person Trenching and Excavation Training Includes: 

  • Definitions of Key Terms Used in the OSHA Excavation Standards (1926 Subpart P) 
  • OSHA Requirements (federal and state) for being a Competent Person on an excavation site 
  • General Hazards Associated with Trenching and Excavation Work 
  • Requirements for Locating and Working Near Underground Utilities (including State utility codes) 
  • Dangers Associated with Water Accumulation 
  • Access and Egress from Trenches and Excavations 
  • Exposure to Vehicular Traffic 
  • Identifying and Addressing Potential Atmospheric Hazards Associated with Excavation Work 
  • Soil Testing and Classification System (per appendix A of the OSHA excavation standard) 
  • Requirements for Protective Systems 
  • Sloping and Benching 
  • Shoring 
  • Trench Boxes 
  • Other protective systems 
  • Competent Person Inspection Requirements 
  • OSHA Directives and Interpretations Related to Trenching and Excavation 
  • Handling OSHA Enforcement Inspections at Trenching and Excavation Sites    

 

Common FAQs 

What industries require this OSHA training? 

While excavating and trenching have a number of important applications (such as in mining, environmental restoration, and exploration), their use in the construction industry is one of the most common. These operations are used in the construction industry for pipe laying, building foundations, utility work, and more. 

 

Why do I need Excavation and Trenching training? 

This required OSHA training for excavations and trenching as specified in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P requires employers to implement specific practices that will help reduce the risk of on-the-job deaths, injuries, and illnesses at trenching and excavation sites. 

While working in and around trenching and excavation worksites, some of the dangers include: cave-ins, exposure to falling loads, electrocutions, oxygen deficiency, falls, and hazardous atmospheres and others.  

OSHA requires a “Competent Person” to oversee operations at an excavation or trenching site to ensure safety protocols are in place. The “Competent Person” is responsible for classifying soil, inspecting protective systems, and monitoring the site for new and/or additional hazards. 

OSHA requires an employer have a designated “Competent Person Fall Protection” on all construction job sites. This designee will have the necessary experience and/or knowledge to recognize fall hazards, correct unsafe conditions, and has the ability to shut down the worksite until any and all hazards are corrected. 

After an individual completes fall protection, they will be able to identify common hazards and explain important safety practices to help ensure job site safety and that each team member is can recognize fall hazards and understand how to keep themselves and coworkers safe. 
 

This AOS course is designed for the construction industry. Course topics include: 

  • An overview of what fall protection is 
  • The most common fall hazards
  • How to evaluate fall hazards and provide control
  • Fall prevention requirements, training, & helpful guides
  • Passive and active fall protection systems
  • Alternate fall protection systems
  • Fall protection planning
  • Additional fall protection considerations 
     

OSHA requires that the designated competent person be able to teach others how to avoid falls and mitigate hazards. This course also aligns with requirements and standards that may pertain to your job site and are required by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), National Institute for Occupational Safety, as well as NIOSH recommendations for workplace safety. 

Employers that have hazardous chemicals in their workplace are required by OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard, or more commonly called HazCom, to implement a hazard communication program to protect employees from hazardous chemicals that are used or stored in the workplace. This OSHA regulation is also known as “Right To Know” and stipulates that training and information is provided to any employees who have the potential of being exposed to a hazardous chemical "under normal condition of use or in a foreseeable emergency.” 
 

The presence of hazardous chemicals are required to be communicated to employees in the following ways: 

  • Current Company Safety Manual (Link to AOS Safety Manuals)
  • A displayed inventory of hazardous chemicals
  • Provide information on Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) / Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
  • Labels, tags, and/or signs 

The OSHA HazCom Standard coincides with the Globally Harmonized System of Chemical Classification and Labeling (GHS). There are requirements for: 

  • Hazard classification 
  • Labeling and marking 
  • Safety Data Sheets (SDS) 
  • Training and information 

OSHA regulations require an employer to: 

  • Train employees on the hazardous chemicals in the workplace  
  • Instruct workers on how to recognize exposure to hazardous chemicals 
  • Provide training on container label elements 
  • Offer instruction on Safety Data Sheet (SDS) format and content 
  • Explain to employees how to access SDSs
  • Update SDSs when new versions become available
  • Update the written HazCom program as needed
  • Explain to employees how to obtain a copy of the written HazCom program
  • Train employees on any in-house labeling system used
  • Make sure all container labels in the workplace are compliant 

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is defined by OSHA as “equipment worn to minimize exposure to hazards that cause serious workplace injuries and illnesses.”  

OSHA requires employers to train each worker that needs to use personal protective equipment to know: 

  • When it is necessary 
  • What kind is necessary
  • How to properly put it on, adjust, wear and take it off
  • The limitations of the equipment
  • Proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the equipment 

If PPE is needed on a job site or in a place of work, a specific PPE program is required by OSHA. The PPE program should address the hazards that are present; the selection, maintenance, and use of PPE; the training of employees; and monitoring of the program to ensure its ongoing effectiveness. 

Furthermore, OSHA requires that many categories of personal protective equipment meet or be equivalent to standards developed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).  

OSHA Training Documentation

Proper OSHA documentation is a critical aspect of employee safety and health training. In addition to conducting onsite workplace safety and health training, we will make sure that your company’s employees sign safety training logs upon successful completion of each applicable OSHA topic. If your company is inspected by OSHA, you will need to have OSHA training documentation accessible. Each employee will receive a certificate of completion available in our Learning Management System, also accessible by company management.  DOL OSHA Cards are mailed directly to your employees.

A Team of Experienced OSHA Trainers

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Our experienced trainers are known for their quality instruction. We keep students engaged using real life examples, interacting with the students throughout the course.  Our goal is to educate your employees on the importance of safety in the workplace and the value in following OSHA guidelines and regulations.

All of our onsite trainings are delivered by our highly qualified safety instructors who travel all over the United States and have qualifications such as:

  • Certified Safety Professionals (CSP) 
  • Authorized OSHA Outreach Trainers
  • Hazwoper Trainers
  • Spanish Speaking Trainers
  • Expert Witnesses & Accident Investigation Specialists